13 Windows Diagnostics Tools to Check Your PC’s Health

No matter who you are, whether newbie or veteran, your Windows system will eventually run into problems that aren’t so easy to diagnose. (It happens on other operating systems too.) When that happens, what do you do?
You could hire somebody to troubleshoot the problem for you, but that should be a last resort. There’s no need to pay someone when you can easily figure out the problem on your own using tools you can download for free.
We recommend giving these tools a try first. You might be surprised by how much you can solve with these alone! If you STILL can’t fix the issue, then sure, bring in the cavalry. computer science  computer science  computer science  computer science  computer science  computer science  computer science  computer science  computer science

Windows System Diagnostic Tools

Hardware problems can be a huge pain in the neck on Windows. They tend to occur most often when you’re using an older version of the operating system (e.g. Windows 7 or Windows 8) or a cutting edge version (e.g. Windows Insider).  computer science  computer science  computer science  computer science  computer science  computer science  computer science  computer science computer science  computer science  computer science 
But sometimes you just want to know which hardware you’re using. These are the tools you should absolutely know how to use for any of these use cases.  computer science  computer science  computer science  computer science

1. CPU-Z


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CPU-Z is a nifty little program that scans your system for its internal hardware configuration. It’s indispensable if you ever want to upgrade your PC parts and want to avoid incompatibility issues.  computer science 
But it’s also good for when you forget which components you have installed, especially if you built your own PC, as well as for verifying the components when buying a used PC from someone you may not trust.

2. Performance Monitor


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As in older versions of the operating system, Windows 10 has a Performance Monitor, except now it exists as an app. Once launched, look at the sidebar. Under Monitoring Tools, you should see Performance Monitor.
By default, the Monitor only shows “% Processor Time” which displays how much of your CPU is used at any given time, but you can add more Counters such as disk usage, energy used, paging file size, search index size, and more.

3. Reliability Monitor


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The Reliability Monitor is a hidden tool that’s been around since Windows Vista, yet so many people have never even heard of it. It’s in the Control Panel under System & Security > Security & Maintenance > Maintenance > View reliability history.
Here you’ll see a history of your system and a timeline of events and errors that occurred during a given time period. The blue line is an estimate from 1 to 10 of how stable your system is over time.
If something is crashing a lot, this is a good place to look because you can select the error and Check for a solution.

Windows Network Diagnostic Tools

Whether you’re using Wi-Fi or Ethernet, there’s a good chance you’re going to run into network problems. It’s one of the most common problems to have these days. That’s why you need these tools.

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